Meshdynamics
Frequently Asked Questions 2/2

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Does the Meshdynamics MD4000 support Mobile Mesh Networking?      
Yes.  Meshdynamics 4455 and 4325 mobility nodes have been demonstrated in field tests both by US military and US allies. They have validated that the MD4000 provides superior connectivity even at high speeds. Applications include video surveillance with cameras mounted on vehicles and connecting with nodes along the road. Field tests also include mobile vehicle to mobile video feeds over a multiple hop static node network. Both static and mobile units have been in operation along the Arizona Mexico border since 2005. Mobile units have also been employed in armored vehicle convoy applications in Iraq. [More]
         
Does Meshdynamics support GPS ?
Yes.  MD4000 mesh node may be equipped with a GPS receiver. The GPS information is integrated into the Network Management System (NMS).  The administrator downloads a map of the geographical area of the mesh deployment into the NMS.  The mesh-node icons of the GPS-enabled MD4000s will move in real-time on the downloaded map.  The actual locations of the mesh nodes will correspond to locations on the downloaded map.  See: GPS Sensor and Video on NMS tracking
 
Have Meshdynamics nodes been used in explosive environments (e.g. underground coal mining)?
Yes, with enclosure modifications. The components on MD4000 single board computer runs on 3.3V. If 3.3V are supplied directly to the MD4000 board (eliminating the DC-DC converter) then the system becomes intrinsically safe. No sparks can occur at that low voltage. Since 5-6 amps are needed at this low voltage to drive the mesh radios and processor, the mesh node enclosure will use a different set of connectors than the standard RJ45 connectors. Contact Technical Support for details. [Example]
 
Has Meshdynamics products being deployed in harsh environments with intense vibration or shock loading ?
Yes, with enclosure modifications. The MD4000 enclosure is housed in a protective harmonic damping container with aircraft dampening foam. The units have been tested by the military with shock loading. Contact Technical Support for details.
   
What are the operating temperature range for Meshdynamics Nodes ?
All components within the Meshdynamics MD4000 enclosure - processor, radios etc - are rated to operate between - 20 to + 85 Celsius. The weather proof system is sealed- there is no air flow into the box. Heat exchange is by conduction and convention with the box. The box is die cast aluminum, weather tight and NEMA rated.  Also see Weather Proofing RJ45 Connectors.
 
Does Meshdynamics mesh nodes support the 4.9GHz Public Safety Band?
Yes.  Any of the MD4000's radio cards (uplink, downlink, AP, scanner) may also use the 4.9GHz licensed Public Safety band. 
   
Can Meshdynamics support non standard frequency bands? 
Yes. Our mesh framework is frequency and radio card agnostic. 2.4GHz, 5GHz, 4.9GHz radio cards are part of our standard product offerings. 900 MHz is also supported, but with some limitations. In general, if the radio card of interest uses an Atheros based chipset, our Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) supports it. If the radio is not Atheros based, then NRE costs will be required. 
  
Does Meshdynamics support NMS branding/customization for OEM customers ?  
Yes.  OEM customers may have their logos on a custom version of the NMS. See NMS Branding Guidelines for details.  
  
Is prioritization for voice and video data traffic provided?
Yes. The Network Management System allows the implementation of 802.11e to wireless clients based on a number of parameters such as IP address and VLAN. In addition, Video packets may be sent in smaller packets (fragmentation) to reduce the probably of occurrence of CRC errors - smaller the packet, less probability of CRC errors. Settings are available on the NMS User Guide. 
 
Does Meshdynamics support customer application integration?
Yes. The Meshdynamics Network stack supports customer applications running above the networking layer. Applications have been developed involving both static and mobile nodes. For example application software on mesh nodes polls sensors via the serial line  interface. The sensor data is massaged and then routed across the mesh. The massaged data is displayed on a customized versions of the NMS that supported both real time database updates and remote viewing via web server interfaces.   

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